Dock Lines

More
6 months 2 weeks ago #3135 by Jim phillips
Dock Lines was created by Jim phillips
To all...

Our docklines are beat up and need replacing before we make our transit.

Do you guys use 3/4 or 5/8 docklines and from what I read I need two Bow/Stern lines 2 @ 30 feet and two spring lines at 2 @ 50 feet?

Is that correct by you all? We are a Whitby 42.

Thanks all!

Jim and Lisa

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
6 months 2 weeks ago - 6 months 2 weeks ago #3136 by Steven Lott
Replied by Steven Lott on topic Dock Lines
Short answer: perfect.

Longer answer.

Our anchor uses ⅝ so that’s why I think it’s adequate for docking.

During hurricane prep in Chesapeake Bay we doubled the dock lines. It’s not easy with a single midship clear that can only hold one ⅝” line. So we used the winches. That also meant four springs and like 8 bow-stern.

I would also have two ¾” 20’ to use though mooring balls. Very thick. More chafe before they give out. And we have old firehouse chafe guard.

In one marina, we had a forward spring that was permanently rigged to the midship cleat. CA would drop the loop over the piling as we came in. The length would stop us from hitting the dock. CA would announce “brakes are on” and I could power into the slip.

In our latest marina, the pilings are too tall for that, so we leave the 5/8” brake line on the dock. When the come in, CA snags the line with a boat hook, drops it on the midship cleat. Calls out “brakes are on” and I can finish entry into the slip knowing I can’t hit the dock.
Last edit: 6 months 2 weeks ago by Steven Lott.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
6 months 1 week ago #3137 by Terry Temperly
Replied by Terry Temperly on topic Dock Lines
West Marine, Defender, Don Casey, etc have thoughts on this. But here are my comments, in addition to Steve. Transient or home dock can influence final decision.
1. Size.
General rule of thumb is 1/8 inch per 9 feet of boat, so 5/8 for 42 ft. 3/4 won't hurt you, just cost more, take more space.
2. Length.
Minimum for bow and stern is 1.5 times boat beam, so 20 for us. For springs 3/4 LOA, so 30 for us.
More common is 2/3 LOA for for bow and stern, so 30 for us. 1 boat length for springs would be 40.
To eliminate confusion: a.) Buy all at 40 feet, then just grab one without concern at the momemt of how long is it. Or b.) Color code, for example red, green for bow/stern (shorter) and white, black for longer springs.
3. Number.
Alongside dock needs 1 bow, 1 stern, 2 springs.
If in a u-shape dock, or pilings available opposite dock, then need extra bow and stern (6 total lines).
4. Material.
3 strand nylon, due to strength, stretch, ease of splice, and low cost.
5. Chafe.
Not rubber or plastic hose due to heat build up inside as line stretches from boat movement. Woven polyester, nylon, even old blue jeans protect the line.
6. Snubber.
Rubber snubber inserted in line helps reduce shock load on lines at dock. For Anchor chain snubber, bigger is better, 3/4 inch 3 strand nylon. This can also be used for mooring ball connection. Most marinas recommend using 2 lines through the pennant eye, one doubled back to each side of bow. So an extra anchor snubber line, for mooring balls.
Hope this helps!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
6 months 1 week ago #3138 by Scott Lee
Replied by Scott Lee on topic Dock Lines
I like the above answers, but I would add that 'it depends'. Where you cruise and how you use the boat will influence the mooring lines you may want to carry. If you are moving the boat a lot, ending up in different marinas a lot, visiting out-of-the-way places with sometimes challenging docking situations, etc., the key will be flexibility... having lines of sufficient length and diameter to handle most any situation. But long heavy lines are a pain to use every day. And thicker lines don't fit some of our midship cleats very easily. So our solution is to have a set of lines we use every day - small diameter, and easy to handle. These handle about 98% of our docking needs. We also have lines of longer lengths and heavier diameter that we can deploy as needed.

So here is what we carry:
6 - 1/2" × 45' double braid
2 - 5/8" x 60' double braid
2 - 3/4" x 100' three strand
Plus a few other misc. lines we've accumulated over the years that mostly get pulled out for locks so our regular dock lines don't get messy.

If your cruise will take you to an area with wide tidal ranges you'll want even longer lines.

And plenty of chafe guard!

Scott

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
6 months 1 week ago #3139 by Jim phillips
Replied by Jim phillips on topic Dock Lines
Thank you so much!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
6 months 1 week ago #3140 by Jim phillips
Replied by Jim phillips on topic Dock Lines
Thank you,

Right now we have 3 strand, they don't look bad and the chafe gear looks like old fire hose? When the wind get up they creak and groan, we have never used 3 strand, is the noise a sign of age or a function of the braid?

I really appreciate all of the input, were heading back down getting the last of the prep in and checking everything off the list.

Thank you to all of you!

Jim and Lisa

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
6 months 1 week ago - 6 months 1 week ago #3141 by Scott Lee
Replied by Scott Lee on topic Dock Lines
Creaking dock lines is caused by dirt embedded in the lines. The dirt prevents the strands that make up the line from sliding against each other or rubbing against a cleat or chock. This will make them creak and moan and the dirt will eventually wear through the strands weakening the line. Any line that has been in service for even a short time will do this.

Washing the lines helps but it is impossible to get all the dirt out. Washing also makes them easier to handle, tie, untie, coil, etc.

A quick, easy, cheap (but alas, very temporary) silencer that we use often is where a line is creaking, douse the line where it is rubbing against the chock with Dawn dish soap. It will act as a lubricant and stop the noise.

Old fire hose is what we have for chafe gear.

Scott
Last edit: 6 months 1 week ago by Scott Lee.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.109 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum